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Definition mint

Etymology 1

From Middle English mynt, münet (“money, coin”), from Old English mynet (“coin, money”), from late Proto-Germanic *munitą, *munitō (“coin”), from Latin monēta (“place for making coins, coined money”), from the temple of Juno Moneta (named for Monēta mother of the Muses), where coins were made; akin to Dutch munt (“currency, coin, mint”), German Münze (“coin, coinage, mint”), Danish mønt (“coin”), and to Russian моне́та (monéta, “coin”). Doublet of money, which came through Old French.

Noun

mint (plural mints)

  1. A building or institution where money (originally, only coins) is produced under government licence.
  2. (informal) A large amount of money. A vast sum or amount, etc.
  3. (figuratively) Any place regarded as a source of unlimited supply; the supply itself.
Verb

mint (third-person singular simple present mints, present participle minting, simple past and past participle minted)

  1. (transitive) To reproduce (coins), usually en masse, under licence.
  2. To invent; to forge; to fabricate; to fashion.
Adjective

mint (not comparable)

  1. (of condition) as new.
  2. (numismatics) In near-perfect condition; uncirculated.
  3. (philately) Unused with original gum; as issued originally.
  4. (Britain, slang) Very good.

Etymology 2

From Old English minte (“mint plant”), from Proto-Germanic *minta, from Latin menta, probably from a lost Mediterranean language either through Ancient Greek μίνθη (mínthē), μίνθα (míntha) or directly. Akin to Old Norse minta (“mint”).

Noun

mint (plural mints)

  1. Any plant in the genus Mentha in the family Lamiaceae, typically aromatic with square stems.
  2. The flavouring of the plant, either a sweet, a jelly or sauce.
  3. Any plant in the mint family, Lamiaceae.
  4. A green colour, like that of mint.
  5. A mint-flavored candy, often eaten to sweeten the smell of the breath.
Adjective

mint (not comparable)

  1. Of a green colour, like that of the mint plant.

Etymology 3

From Middle English minten, from Old English myntan (“to mean, intend, purpose, determine, resolve”), from Proto-Germanic *muntaną, *muntijaną (“to think, consider”), from Proto-Indo-European *men-, *mnā- (“to think”). Cognate with Saterland Frisian mintsje, muntsje (“to aim, target”), Dutch munten (“to aim at, target”), German Low German münten (“to aim at”), German münzen (“to aim at”), Dutch monter (“cheerful, gladsome, spry”), Gothic ???? (muns, “thought, opinion”), Old English munan (“to be mindful of, consider, intend”). More at mind.

Verb

mint (third-person singular simple present mints, present participle minting, simple past and past participle minted)

(The addition of quotations indicative of this usage is being sought):

  1. (intransitive, provincial, Northern England, Scotland) To try, attempt; take aim.
  2. (transitive, provincial, Northern England, Scotland) To try, attempt, endeavor; to take aim at; to try to hit; to purpose.
  3. (intransitive, chiefly Scotland) To hint; suggest; insinuate.
Noun

mint (plural mints)

(The addition of quotations indicative of this usage is being sought):

  1. (provincial, Northern England, Scotland) Intent, purpose; an attempt, try; effort, endeavor.

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