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Definition full

Etymology 1

From Middle English full, from Old English full (“full”), from Proto-Germanic *fullaz (“full”), from Proto-Indo-European *pl̥h₁nós (“full”).

Germanic cognates include West Frisian fol, Low German vull, Dutch vol, German voll, Danish fuld, and Norwegian and Swedish full (the latter three via Old Norse). Proto-Indo-European cognates include English plenty (via Latin, compare plēnus), Welsh llawn, Russian по́лный (pólnyj), Lithuanian pilnas, Persian پر‎ (por), Sanskrit पूर्ण (pūrṇa). See also fele.

Adjective

full (comparative fuller, superlative fullest)

  1. Containing the maximum possible amount of that which can fit in the space available.
  2. Complete; with nothing omitted.
  3. Total, entire.
  4. (informal) Having eaten to satisfaction, having a "full" stomach; replete.
  5. (informal, with of) Replete, abounding with.
  6. (of physical features) Plump, round.
  7. Of a garment, of a size that is ample, wide, or having ample folds or pleats to be comfortable.
  8. Having depth and body; rich.
  9. (obsolete) Having the mind filled with ideas; stocked with knowledge; stored with information.
  10. Having the attention, thoughts, etc., absorbed in any matter, and the feelings more or less excited by it.
  11. Filled with emotions.
  12. (obsolete) Impregnated; made pregnant.
  13. (poker, postnominal) Said of the three cards of the same rank in a full house.
  14. (Australia) Drunk, intoxicated
Adverb

full (not comparable)

  1. (archaic) Fully; quite; very; thoroughly; completely; exactly; entirely.

Etymology 2

From Middle English fulle, fylle, fille, from Old English fyllu, fyllo (“fullness, fill, plenty”), from Proto-Germanic *fullį̄, *fulnō (“fullness, filling, overflow”), from Proto-Indo-European *plūno-, *plno- (“full”), from *pelh₁-, *pleh₁- (“to fill; full”). Cognate with German Fülle (“fullness, fill”), Icelandic fylli (“fulness, fill”). More at fill.

Noun

full (plural fulls)

  1. Utmost measure or extent; highest state or degree; the state, position, or moment of fullness; fill.
  2. (of the moon) The phase of the moon when it is entire face is illuminated, full moon.
  3. (freestyle skiing) An aerialist maneuver consisting of a backflip in conjunction and simultaneous with a complete twist.
Verb

full (third-person singular simple present fulls, present participle fulling, simple past and past participle fulled)

  1. (of the moon) To become full or wholly illuminated.

Etymology 3

From Middle English fullen, fulwen, from Old English fullian, fulwian (“to baptise”), from Proto-Germanic *fullawīhōną (“to fully consecrate”), from *fulla- (“full-”) + *wīhōną (“to hallow, consecrate, make holy”). Compare Old English fulluht, fulwiht (“baptism”).

Verb

full (third-person singular simple present fulls, present participle fulling, simple past and past participle fulled)

  1. (transitive) To baptise.

Etymology 4

From Middle English [Term?], from Old French fuller, fouler (“to tread, to stamp, to full”), from Medieval Latin fullare, from Latin fullo (“a fuller”)

Verb

full (third-person singular simple present fulls, present participle fulling, simple past and past participle fulled)

  1. To make cloth denser and firmer by soaking, beating and pressing, to waulk, walk

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