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Definition bog

Etymology 1

From Middle English bog, from Irish and Scottish Gaelic bogach (“soft, boggy ground”), from Old Irish bog (“soft”), from Proto-Celtic *buggos (“soft, tender”) + Old Irish -ach, from Proto-Celtic *-ākos.

The frequent use to form compounds regarding the animals and plants in such areas mimics Irish compositions such as bog-luachair (“bulrush, bogrush”).

Its use for toilets is now often derived from the resemblance of latrines and outhouse cesspools to bogholes, but the noun sense appears to be a clipped form of boghouse (“outhouse, privy”), which derived (possibly via boggard) from the verb to bog, still used in Australian English. The derivation and its connection to other senses of "bog" remains uncertain, however, owing to an extreme lack of early citations due to its perceived vulgarity.

Noun

bog (plural bogs)

  1. (Originally Ireland and Scotland) An area of decayed vegetation (particularly sphagnum moss) which forms a wet spongy ground too soft for walking; a marsh or swamp.
  2. (figuratively) Confusion, difficulty, or any other thing or place that impedes progress in the manner of such areas.
  3. (uncountable) The acidic soil of such areas, principally composed of peat; marshland, swampland.
  4. (Britain, Ireland, Australia and New Zealand colloquial) A place to defecate: originally specifically a latrine or outhouse but now used for any toilet.
  5. (Australia and New Zealand colloquial) An act or instance of defecation.
  6. (US, dialectal) A little elevated spot or clump of earth, roots, and grass, in a marsh or swamp.
Verb

bog (third-person singular simple present bogs, present participle bogging, simple past and past participle bogged)

  1. (transitive, now often with "down") To sink or submerge someone or something into bogland.
  2. (figuratively) to prevent or slow someone or something from making progress.
  3. (intransitive, now often with "down") To sink and stick in bogland.
  4. (figuratively) To be prevented or impeded from making progress, to become stuck.
  5. (intransitive, originally vulgar Britain, now chiefly Australia) To defecate, to void one's bowels.
  6. (transitive, originally vulgar Britain, now chiefly Australia) To cover or spray with excrement.
  7. (transitive, Britain, informal) To make a mess of something.

Etymology 2

See bug

Noun

bog (plural bogs)

  1. (obsolete) Alternative form of bug: a bugbear, monster, or terror.

Etymology 3

Of uncertain etymology, although possibly related to bug in its original senses of "big" and "puffed up".

Adjective

bog (comparative bogger, superlative boggest)

  1. (obsolete) Bold; boastful; proud.
Noun

bog (plural bogs)

  1. (obsolete) Puffery, boastfulness.
Verb

bog (third-person singular simple present bogs, present participle bogging, simple past and past participle bogged)

  1. (transitive, obsolete) To provoke, to bug.

Etymology 4

From bug off, a clipping of bugger off, likely under the influence of bog (coarse British slang for "toilet[s]").

Verb

bog (third-person singular simple present bogs, present participle bogging, simple past and past participle bogged)

  1. (euphemistic, slang, Britain, usually with "off") To go away.

Results 100 Words with the letters BOG

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