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Definition mow

Etymology 1

From Middle English mowen (participle mowen), from Old English māwan (past tense mēow, past participle māwen), from Proto-Germanic *mēaną (compare Dutch maaien, German mähen, Danish meje, Swedish meja), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂meh₁- (“to mow, reap”); compare Hittite [script needed] (ḫamešḫa, “spring/early summer”, literally “mowing time”), Latin metō (“I harvest, mow”), Ancient Greek ἀμάω (amáō, “I mow”).

Verb

mow (third-person singular simple present mows, present participle mowing, simple past mowed, past participle mowed or mown)

  1. (transitive) To cut down grass or crops.
  2. (transitive) To cut down or slaughter in great numbers.

Etymology 2

Middle English mowe, from Middle French moue (“lip, pout”), borrowed from Old French moe (“grimace”), from Frankish *mauwa (“pout, protruding lip”), from Proto-Germanic *mawwō (“muff, sleeve”). Akin to Middle Dutch mouwe (“protruding lip”). Cognate to moue (“pout”).

Noun

mow (plural mows)

  1. (now only dialectal) A scornful grimace; a wry face. [from 14th c.]
Verb

mow (third-person singular simple present mows, present participle mowing, simple past and past participle mowed)

  1. To make grimaces, mock.

Etymology 3

Old English mūga. Cognate with Norwegian muge (“heap, crowd, flock”).

Noun

mow (plural mows)

  1. (now regional) A stack of hay, corn, beans or a barn for the storage of hay, corn, beans.
  2. The place in a barn where hay or grain in the sheaf is stowed.
Verb

mow (third-person singular simple present mows, present participle mowing, simple past and past participle mowed)

  1. (agriculture) To put into mows.

Etymology 4

Noun

mow (plural mows)

  1. Alternative form of mew (a seagull)

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