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Definition dub

Etymology 1

From a Late Old English (11th century) word dubban (“to knight by striking with a sword”) perhaps borrowed from Old French aduber, adober "equip with arms; adorn" (also 11th century, Modern French adouber), from Frankish *dubban, from Proto-Germanic *dubjaną (“to fit”), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰewbʰ- (“plug, peg, wedge”).

Cognate with Icelandic dubba (dubba til riddara). Compare also drub for an English reflex of the Germanic word.

Verb

dub (third-person singular simple present dubs, present participle dubbing, simple past and past participle dubbed)

  1. (transitive) (now historical) To confer knighthood; the conclusion of the ceremony was marked by a tap on the shoulder with a sword.
  2. (transitive) To name, to entitle, to call. [from the later 16th c]
  3. (transitive) To deem.
  4. To clothe or invest; to ornament; to adorn.
  5. (heading) To strike, rub, or dress smooth; to dab.
    1. To dress with an adze.
    2. To strike cloth with teasels to raise a nap.
    3. To rub or dress with grease, as leather in the process of currying it.
    4. To dress a fishing fly.
  6. To prepare (a gamecock) for fighting, by trimming the hackles and cutting off the comb and wattles.

Etymology 2

1505-1515 This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

Verb

dub (third-person singular simple present dubs, present participle dubbing, simple past and past participle dubbed)

  1. To make a noise by brisk drumbeats.
  2. To do something badly.
  3. In golf, to execute a shot poorly.
Noun

dub (plural dubs)

  1. (rare) A blow, thrust, or poke.

Etymology 3

1885-90; Imitative, see also flub, flubdub

Noun

dub (plural dubs)

  1. (now historical) (slang) An unskillful, awkward person. [from the later part of the 19th c]

Etymology 4

From a shortening of the word double.

Verb

dub (third-person singular simple present dubs, present participle dubbing, simple past and past participle dubbed)

  1. To add sound to film or change audio on film. [from the first half of the 20th c]
  2. To make a copy from an original or master audio tape.
  3. To replace the original soundtrack of a film with a synchronized translation
  4. To mix audio tracks to produce a new sound; to remix.
Noun

dub (plural dubs)

  1. (music) A mostly instrumental remix with all or part of the vocals removed.
  2. (music) A style of reggae music involving mixing of different audio tracks.
  3. (music) A growing trend of music from 2009 to current in which bass distortion is synced off timing to electronic dance music.
  4. (slang) A piece of graffiti in metallic colour with a thick black outline.
  5. The replacement of a voice part in a movie or cartoon, particularly with a translation; dubbing.

Etymology 5

From Celtic; compare Irish dobhar (“water”), Welsh dŵr (“water”).

Noun

dub (plural dubs)

  1. (Britain, dialectal) A pool or puddle.

Etymology 6

From shortening of double dime (“twenty”).

Noun

dub (plural dubs)

  1. (slang) A twenty dollar sack of marijuana.
  2. (slang) A wheel rim measuring 20 inches or more.

Etymology 7

From dup (“to open”), from do + up, from Middle English don up (“to open”).

Verb

dub (third-person singular simple present dubs, present participle dubbing, simple past and past participle dubbed)

  1. (obsolete, Britain, thieves' cant) To open or close.
Noun

dub (plural dubs)

  1. (obsolete, Britain, thieves' cant) A lock.
  2. (obsolete, Britain, thieves' cant) A key, especially a master key; a lockpick.

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